stories

Country of the Blind

 
On Wednesday was listening to the Atlanta Radio Theatre Company's adaptation of The Country of the Blind part 1, by H. G. Wells (part 2 of 2 here). I suppose I'd call it a horror story, because it serves to illustrate 1) that in a society constructed around what we regard as disability, an abled person will not necessarily find emself in a position of automatic superiority because the others are not structurally disadvantaged relative to em, and might even be in a position of advantage, and, 2)

Random Star Wars thoughts

 
Saw some folk talking about the forgiveability or lack thereof of Darth Vader, particularly wert the murder of children. The prequel films had not been made at the time Return of the Jedi had been released, and I don't believe Lucas' claims of having planned the whole thing out from the beginning, so usually I am not interested in judging the first three Star Wars films on the basis of actions or emotions depicted in the prequels. I also don't recall Luke saying at any point that he forgave...

Trice's Log: 2015-05-21

 
Finally answered the Malheurs' question about podcasts we listen to ('finally' - it was only yesterday morning). Left a few off because didn't want to flood, though. Mainly SF Crossing The Gulf, science news series like the Nature magazine podcast, and the story magazines like Escape Pod and Podcastle. And some I just can't recommend like Skeptic's Guide to the Universe partly for the often confrontational tone (and associated ablism) but especially what stands out is one of the host's periodic parodies...

Ghostpocalypse

 
When I read this post on ghosts and zombies immediately I thought it could potentially make a really interesting story, if only I could think where to go with it. Start with a zombie apocalypse scenario sweeping across the Earth, leading to almost the entire population of the world ending up as ghosts and... then what? The whole species having to decide "we've been wiped out, we're extinct but we're still here, now what do we do?" Visualising plot strands of despair, would-be suicidal reactions,

Other listening

 
On the other hand, a string of stories at Podcastle left me feeling alienated, being centred as they were so strongly on US self-mythologising. A very distinct sense, which I have the privilege of experiencing relatively rarely, that I was not and never could be the audience for these stories. The Ant King: A California Fairy Tale by Benjamin Rosenbaum is as the title suggests a fairy tale of California. More particularly of capitalism, California, and self-identified geekdom. Self-conscious...

Listening to narrative things

 
Sometimes, listening to podcast fiction is a good way to find new authors. Hearing in fairly close succession For Fear of Dragons at Podcastle and then especially Amaryllis at Lightspeed Magazine, both by Carrie Vaughn, draws her to attention so that I will be keeping an eye out for her name in future as a signifier of good...

Sunday Story Ratings #77: Tell Me Who to Kill by Ian Rankin

 
Tell Me Who to Kill by Ian Rankin Originally published 2003 in Mysterious Pleasures; this edition 2004, 2005 printing Publisher: Allison & Busby Limited Collected in: The Best British Mysteries 2005 (ed. Maxim Jakubowski)   PG Parental Guidance recommended for audiences under 15 years of age (D, V) Drug Use {PG} (G: pre-story beer consumption; coffee; paracetamol. PG: viewpoint character smoking cigarettes; whisky (on-screen, plus POV character's consumption of the...

Sunday Story Ratings #66: Usagi Yojimbo Book 3.3: Return of the Blind Swordspig by Stan Sakai

 
Usagi Yojimbo Book 3: The Wanderer's Road: 3. Return of the Blind Swordspig by Stan Sakai Originally published July 1988 Fantagraphics Books in Usagi Yojimbo Vol. 1 Issue 9; this edition August 2010 Fantagraphics Books   PG Parental Guidance recommended for audiences under 15 years of age (V, D) Violence {PG) Drug Use (G) {Tea}   Representations Gender: Only male characters, and a tokagé (Spot) of unknown gender. Sex: No presence. Race &

Musing around

 
On the way home from work I somehow had an idea for a role-playing campaign. The concept is rather simple: the villain has stolen the abstraction of narrative imperative and is using this to reshape global civilisation to her vision with the force of historical inevitability. The task faced by the player characters is to succeed in sufficiently extravagant and difficult endeavours that they convince the setting it is actually they who are its primary heroes and narrative drivers, this being the only way...

Zombie fiction

 
For a while I have taken to tagging as 'a zombie story' any story in which defeat means being transformed into the enemy. Typically where defeat is something as difficult to avoid as being touched. This seems to be a common trope in the new series of Doctor Who, including The Empty Child / The Doctor Dances, somewhat implicitly in Tooth and Claw, 42, Silence in the Library / Forest of the Dead and The Waters of Mars. Which does not even include all the other episodes in which characters are transformed...